Capitoline and Roman Forum

Descrizione

The Capitoline area had a terrace on three sides, a temple in the middle and two lateral rows of colonnades stretching down towards the  forum. The marble stairway, restored today and reintegrated with bricks, used to lead to the raised pronaos podium, characterized by a central hexastyle forepart with Corinthian columns about 11 meteres tall, restored during the XIV century. The temple has three aulae separated by cavity walls, with large architraved doors leading to the cellars. The sepulchral chapels feature podiums in the middle. The marble slabfloors , well preserved in the central and left cells, are of particular interest. The walls were probably covered in marble and decorated in Corinthian style,  like the columns in front. 


The temple borderd the north side of the Forum and it was linked to the Decuman through a central stairway between two walls with blind arcades.

Traces of houses, burial sitest and production plants from the Longobard period are still present in the monumental archeological area, overlapping or included among the remains of the ancient worshipping site.  Therefore, the archeological area is part of the UNESCO world heritage, together with the San Salvatore-Santa Giulia complex.

The forum, civic and religious heart of the Roman Brixia and given its final setting in the Flavian period (69-96 a.C.), was rectangular, 139 meters long and 40 meters wide, with its south side bordering on the Curia and its north side on the maximus decuman. The east, west and south sides of the Forum were surrounded by a portico with a double order of richly decorated columns  on which many small shops faced. The Basilica was situated on the south side of the Forum: the remains of this construction with tall, grooved Corinthian 

pilaster strips featuring windows and doorways in between, are incorporated in the house at number 3 of the Labus square, headquarter of Lombardy’s Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici. The ground floor, in a small archeological area, hosts the remains of the basilica and the Augustine Forum.

Parts of the Forum are still visible,  for example a monolithic marble column 6.5 meters tall with a Corinthian capital on the East side of the square, 4.5 meters below the actual street level and reintegrated during the 30’s with bricks covering its missing parts.

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The Capitoline area had a terrace on three sides, a temple in the middle and two lateral rows of colonnades stretching down towards the  forum. The marble stairway, restored today and reintegrated with bricks, used to lead to the raised pronaos podium, characterized by a central hexastyle forepart with Corinthian columns about 11 meteres tall, restored during the XIV century. The temple has three aulae separated by cavity walls, with large architraved doors leading to the cellars. The sepulchral chapels feature podiums in the middle. The marble slabfloors , well preserved in the central and left cells, are of particular interest. The walls were probably covered in marble and decorated in Corinthian style,  like the columns in front. 


The temple borderd the north side of the Forum and it was linked to the Decuman through a central stairway between two walls with blind arcades.

Traces of houses, burial sitest and production plants from the Longobard period are still present in the monumental archeological area, overlapping or included among the remains of the ancient worshipping site.  Therefore, the archeological area is part of the UNESCO world heritage, together with the San Salvatore-Santa Giulia complex.

The forum, civic and religious heart of the Roman Brixia and given its final setting in the Flavian period (69-96 a.C.), was rectangular, 139 meters long and 40 meters wide, with its south side bordering on the Curia and its north side on the maximus decuman. The east, west and south sides of the Forum were surrounded by a portico with a double order of richly decorated columns  on which many small shops faced. The Basilica was situated on the south side of the Forum: the remains of this construction with tall, grooved Corinthian 

pilaster strips featuring windows and doorways in between, are incorporated in the house at number 3 of the Labus square, headquarter of Lombardy’s Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici. The ground floor, in a small archeological area, hosts the remains of the basilica and the Augustine Forum.

Parts of the Forum are still visible,  for example a monolithic marble column 6.5 meters tall with a Corinthian capital on the East side of the square, 4.5 meters below the actual street level and reintegrated during the 30’s with bricks covering its missing parts.

East Lombardy is the European region
of gastronomy 2017