Sant’Andrea Basilica

Descrizione

Designed by Leon Battista Alberti, commissioned by Ludovico II Gonzaga, who wanted to make it a symbol of prestige of the house. Work on the basilica begun in 1472, under the direction of architect Luca Fancelli and it was finished only in the second half of the 1700s.

A masterpiece of Renaissance architecture, the construction involved the transformation of the pre-existing Benedictine complex, of which remain the late-gothic bell tower (1413) and a wing of the rear cloister. The richly painted furnishings still testify to the presence of works by Andrea Mantegna, Correggio, Giulio Romano and his students (Bernardino Campi, Rinaldo Mantovano and Andreasino). The floor plan is a Latin cross with a single nave with deep side chapels and denotes a clear reference to the plan of Basilica di Massenzio in Rome. The first chapel on the left, completed with its decorative elements in the second decade of the sixteenth century, is the funerary chapel of Andrea Mantegna who died in Mantua in 1506.

In correspondence with the dome, designed by Filippo Juvarra in 1765, the nineteenth-century marble kneeler refers to the crypt below created by Antonio Maria Viani, where the sacred vases are kept that contain the soil of Calvary soaked in the blood of Christ and collected by San Longino to which the last chapel on the right is dedicated. With an evocative ritual that takes place every Good Friday, the reliquaries are taken to the Basilica and accompany the evening procession through the streets of the city centre. 


Continue

Designed by Leon Battista Alberti, commissioned by Ludovico II Gonzaga, who wanted to make it a symbol of prestige of the house. Work on the basilica begun in 1472, under the direction of architect Luca Fancelli and it was finished only in the second half of the 1700s.

A masterpiece of Renaissance architecture, the construction involved the transformation of the pre-existing Benedictine complex, of which remain the late-gothic bell tower (1413) and a wing of the rear cloister. The richly painted furnishings still testify to the presence of works by Andrea Mantegna, Correggio, Giulio Romano and his students (Bernardino Campi, Rinaldo Mantovano and Andreasino). The floor plan is a Latin cross with a single nave with deep side chapels and denotes a clear reference to the plan of Basilica di Massenzio in Rome. The first chapel on the left, completed with its decorative elements in the second decade of the sixteenth century, is the funerary chapel of Andrea Mantegna who died in Mantua in 1506.

In correspondence with the dome, designed by Filippo Juvarra in 1765, the nineteenth-century marble kneeler refers to the crypt below created by Antonio Maria Viani, where the sacred vases are kept that contain the soil of Calvary soaked in the blood of Christ and collected by San Longino to which the last chapel on the right is dedicated. With an evocative ritual that takes place every Good Friday, the reliquaries are taken to the Basilica and accompany the evening procession through the streets of the city centre. 


East Lombardy is the European region
of gastronomy 2017